Chinese Hanyang Type 88

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Candyman
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Chinese Hanyang Type 88

Post by Candyman »

Copy of the German Gewehr 88
The Type 88, sometimes known as "Hanyang 88", was a Chinese rifle that was issued to the National Revolutionary Army during the Second Sino-Japanese War. The name derived from the Hanyang Arsenal factory that made this rifle.
Production started in 1895. The Hanyang 88 was used throughout the Second Sino-Japanese War and the early phase of the Chinese civil war, when the Hanyang Arsenal was shut down in 1947.

Wars in which these rifles saw action:
First Sino-Japanese War, Boxer Rebellion, Xinhai revolution, Long march, Central Plains War, Chinese civil war, Second Sino-Japanese War, Korean War.

I did some horse treading with a friend to add this one to my collection.
IMG_1597.JPG
Kmtarmy.jpg
I just got it yesterday and will take some good pics to post.
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Do not relish to feel what the men that used these weapons felt when they saw the elephant. For the elephant has tusk and to see him is to have his tusk dig deep into your soul. You will always have a part of you that will be cold and empty.
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Flintlock Tom
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Re: Chinese Hanyang Type 88

Post by Flintlock Tom »

What?! Is this a "weekly" thing with you??? :shock:

Friend: Why did you buy this Chinese rifle?
Candyman: It's Thursday.

;)
If time, chance and random process can produce a platypus why not an ammo tree?
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Candyman
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Re: Chinese Hanyang Type 88

Post by Candyman »

Flintlock Tom wrote:What?! Is this a "weekly" thing with you??? :shock:

Friend: Why did you buy this Chinese rifle?
Candyman: It's Thursday.

;)
Well this is my 57th gun for the year and there are only 52 weeks in the year, you do the math. :lol: :lol:
Do not relish to feel what the men that used these weapons felt when they saw the elephant. For the elephant has tusk and to see him is to have his tusk dig deep into your soul. You will always have a part of you that will be cold and empty.
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mekender
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Re: Chinese Hanyang Type 88

Post by mekender »

Man... I dont know where you get all these nice toys but I am jealous.
“I no longer need to run as a Presidential Candidate for the Socialist Party. The Democrat Party has adopted our platform.” - Norman Thomas, a six time candidate for president for the Socialist Party, 1944
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Denis
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Re: Chinese Hanyang Type 88

Post by Denis »

Wow. What an interesting piece. Well wear!
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Candyman
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Re: Chinese Hanyang Type 88

Post by Candyman »

Here is something funny. It is chambered for 8mm Mauser and the bore is a little dark with good rifling. I pulled a bullet from a 8mm Mauser round and dropped it into the bore at the muzzle. Other then a little ratteling it went all the way thrugh the barrel. :lol: This reall doesn't bother me because, I bought it more for my collection and not for shooting.
Do not relish to feel what the men that used these weapons felt when they saw the elephant. For the elephant has tusk and to see him is to have his tusk dig deep into your soul. You will always have a part of you that will be cold and empty.
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Jered
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Re: Chinese Hanyang Type 88

Post by Jered »

You don't want to shoot 8mm Mauser ammo in a Gew 88 commission rifle anyway.
The avalanche has already started. It is too late for the pebbles to vote.
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Windy Wilson
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Re: Chinese Hanyang Type 88

Post by Windy Wilson »

Candyman wrote:Wars in which these rifles saw action:
First Sino-Japanese War, Boxer Rebellion, Xinhai revolution, Long march, Central Plains War, Chinese civil war, Second Sino-Japanese War, Korean War.
All those wars in less than 60 years!??!

:shock: :shock:
And that doesn't count the "Great Leap Forward".
The use of the word "but" usually indicates that everything preceding it in a sentence is a lie.
E.g.:
"I believe in Freedom of Speech, but". . .
"I support the Second Amendment, but". . .
--Randy
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Candyman
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Re: Chinese Hanyang Type 88

Post by Candyman »

Windy Wilson wrote:
Candyman wrote:Wars in which these rifles saw action:
First Sino-Japanese War, Boxer Rebellion, Xinhai revolution, Long march, Central Plains War, Chinese civil war, Second Sino-Japanese War, Korean War.
All those wars in less than 60 years!??!

:shock: :shock:
And that doesn't count the "Great Leap Forward".
I guess they just had trouble getting along with others. :roll:
Do not relish to feel what the men that used these weapons felt when they saw the elephant. For the elephant has tusk and to see him is to have his tusk dig deep into your soul. You will always have a part of you that will be cold and empty.
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Dinochrome
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Re: Chinese Hanyang Type 88

Post by Dinochrome »

The Gew-88 Commission rifle was caliber .318 according to my sketchy memory, while the WW2 8MM Mauser cartridge was .323.

My first bolt-action rifle was a variant of the Commission rifle that was sold to Turkey; it had no barrel shroud, the bore was .323,
and the receiver was cut for loading with a stripper-clip. I fired hundreds of rounds of commercial 8MM through it with no hint of trouble.
But one day at the rifle range at NWSTF Boardman, I encountered a cartridge headstamped "FCPQ 46"; it was identical to
the commercial rounds except for the FMJ bullet. Foolishly, I chambered it and pulled the trigger. The report was somewhat louder
than the previous shots but the recoil was the same. The main difference was that I needed a section of 2X4 to open the bolt,....
No visible damage to the rifle, but I never fired it again.

Some of my friends suggested that it might have been a high-pressure round intended for a machine-gun. I still have about 30 of them.

By the way, the rifle cost me $29.95 at Big Five Sporting Goods in Riverside, CA in 1979. I sold it along with the Turkish bayonet to a collector in El Centro for $100 back in 1988. He was firmly convinced that it shouldn't be fired with modern ammo.
"Fair is fair; If somebody tries to kill you, kill them right back."
Captain Malcolm of Serenity
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