Ceramic Kitchen Knives

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308Mike
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Joined: Wed Aug 13, 2008 3:47 pm

Re: Ceramic Kitchen Knives

Post by 308Mike »

HTRN wrote:I haven't heard anything about not using ceramic blades on tomatoes. I do know that non stainless blades can get stained - that why well used meat cleavers often look nasty even when clean - the blood does wonders on moly steel.
I have a couple of Anza knives in the RV, and you can tell they've been used to cut steak even though they get cleaned and dried immediately after eating. I also have an old high carbon steel produce knife with a 10" blade, and it's stained as well. It will rust overnight if not cleaned and dried soon after use.
POLITICIANS & DIAPERS NEED TO BE CHANGED OFTEN AND FOR THE SAME REASON

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SeekHer
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Re: Ceramic Kitchen Knives

Post by SeekHer »

I apologize for the confusion, I caused.

There is nothing wrong with using ceramic knives on acidic foods, actually they are superb for tomatoes as they don't impart a "steel" taste to the slices...What I should have said was--"Without cleaning it immediately afterwards"!, which should apply to all knives at all times...Mea Culpa

I had a white bladed paring knife that got left overnight in a plate of strawberries and raspberries that the following morning had a permanent reddish tip and red along one side of the blade and you could feel a slight "coarseness" on that area...It may be due to the fact that the knife being a really, really [strike]inexpensive[/strike] cheap one but I shant subject my good blades to any further testing.

It broke, exactly behind the stain, a couple of years later while a daughter was cutting radishes (?) on a wooden block...Whether it failed due to the staining or just a heavy handed kid I don't know but we've lost at least a half dozen of that model over the years and almost always in the same area, about halfway up the blade...Probably fifteen years ago, the local restaurant supple house had them on sale for around $15 each if you bought a dozen, $35, $40 if you didn't...I did and there are now two left; one is stashed in my wife's "Drawer of Doom" and the other, sits as a letter opener on her desk at work...I know that in the first week we had them at home, we killed three of them, including me, learning how to use them--Two broke at the very tip and then mine broke at the handle joint--Word of Warning, they do not take to being used as a pry bar separating two frozen steaks--six stitches later taught me that!!!
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308Mike
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Re: Ceramic Kitchen Knives

Post by 308Mike »

Prying is how I snapped off the tip of my blade while it was against a chicken bone. I felt it when it happened, and I IMMEDIATELY KNEW I had broken my blade 'cause I was worried I was putting too much stress on the tip while cutting the chicken.

I have a couple of much thicker ceramic blades to work with, but I don't like them nearly as much. Certainly they aren't as delicate as my other blades, but they also aren't as precise, easy to use, and don't feel as light and nimble in the hand - so they aren't as pleasurable to use - as simple as that. I'd much prefer (in the kitchen) to use my knife which has a higher & thinner blade and tapers to the tip, than a less high and thicker blade - simply 'cause the thinner blade feels more comfortable and easier to use even if I can't pry with it. When using this blade, I've found ways to get around it's limitations and thoroughly enjoy using it all the time.

Ceramic blades are GREAT for using with vegetables since they don't impart any kind of metallic taste, nor discolor the cut edges of lettuce when making salads. I've found them to be incredibly versatile and since they don't impart any kind of metallic taste, they're great for a great many of vegetables or fruits. You just have to make sure you clean them right away when you get done using them.

I'm also of the opinion of you get what you pay for when buying knives/blades - as long as you do your homework and know what you're looking for. However, if buying from a reputable dealer, they won't screw you over just trying to make a sale knowing you'll come back after discovering you actually made a good purchase and they didn't stiff you with a cheap product. They WANT you to come back later and buy from them, so they will likely try to educate you regarding certain knives/blades - this is NOT a bad sign. But keep your eyes and ears open for things which don't sound right - Damascus steel with no fold lines visible, short warranties - something like 10 days from date of purchase, not sure of what they're talking about, etc., etc.

Try to become an educated consumer BEFORE YOU PURCHASE.
POLITICIANS & DIAPERS NEED TO BE CHANGED OFTEN AND FOR THE SAME REASON

A person properly schooled in right and wrong is safe with any weapon. A person with no idea of good and evil is unsafe with a knitting needle, or the cap from a ballpoint pen.

I remain pessimistic given the way BATF and the anti gun crowd have become tape worms in the guts of the Republic. - toad
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HTRN
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Re: Ceramic Kitchen Knives

Post by HTRN »

308Mike wrote:discolor the cut edges of lettuce when making salads
You can also use a cheap plastic lettuce knife for greens - they also can be used on nonstick cookware, like cake rounds.

The reason why lettuce browns has to do with cells being ruptured and exposed to oxygen. Metal just accelerates the process. If you're gonna cut up a bunch of lettuce ahead of time and store in the fridge, you're better off tearing the lettuce by hand, as it ruptures far fewer cells, thus decreasing browning.
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brandonman
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Re: Ceramic Kitchen Knives

Post by brandonman »

Precision wrote: Thu May 05, 2011 4:49 pm
HTRN wrote:
Precision wrote:My good set, the set I used as a Pro Chef are Global.
It's funny, but everybody who uses kitchen knives for a living invariably choose Either Mac or Global, both brands I've never seen in retail.
They are good knives and for the money a great value. The moly steel they use holds a good edge and the edge lasts quite well. The unibody construction is good, the balance is great. I got them when they first came to the US. I own the very first western style chef's knife imported. I even got it at a discount because it was used as an advertising prop and not in its original wrapper. The lady at the retail store would call me after each new photo shoot and see if I wanted what they had just shot. 20% off is a good thing.

Here is where I buy my culinary knives.

http://www.jbprince.com/


Decent prices and a very good company.
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