Estwing goes medieval.

The place to talk about knives, swords, edged weapons, sticks and impact weapons, restraints, and and the techniques and tools for preparedness and survival without firearms.
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Steamforger
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Estwing goes medieval.

Post by Steamforger » Mon Jan 12, 2015 8:47 am

Depends on your preference I guess.

Tomahawk

Double Bit Axe

Both are available at Home Despot for $39.99. I succumbed to temptation and got the Double Bit tonight. This thing is hefty. Mine came pre-nicked on one bit. The American employee who made it still dipped it in the protective goop anyway. A little file time will remove most of it, but no big deal in the long run. It's made to whack things with. There's no doubt whatsoever it will wreak havoc on anything "coming right for you..."

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Netpackrat
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Re: Estwing goes medieval.

Post by Netpackrat » Mon Jan 12, 2015 9:14 am

I saw one of the Estwing double bit axes once; it seemed too small to really be useful for anything. Not to mention that putting one of the more dangerous (to the user) woods tools in the hands of greater numbers of "average" users, is probably a bad idea. Good job security for Ass-op though.
Cognosce teipsum et disce pati

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PawPaw
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Re: Estwing goes medieval.

Post by PawPaw » Mon Jan 12, 2015 11:49 am

Axes are so paleo, they haven't changed much in millenia, simple small changes over the years to meet some perceived need, or to take advantage of upgraded material, but basically they're a sharp blade on a stick to increase mechanical advantage.

I own several and I've never been a fan of the double-bit axe, simply because I don't need a cutting edge that close to my back. I've seen professionals use them, and I've known some men who were very good with an ax (and an adze, and a froe, but I digress). Be careful with that thing, you'll cut your leg off.
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Netpackrat
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Re: Estwing goes medieval.

Post by Netpackrat » Mon Jan 12, 2015 1:27 pm

In the absence of saws, the double-bit axe is supposed to be the shiznit for felling trees. Not just because you can go longer without needing to sharpen, but also the balance, and the way it bites into a tree (sectional density?) makes it more efficient to use. But that's pretty much what it is good for, and the power saw has made it obsolete. It's a bad choice for general chores due to lack of a "safe" edge. And the undersized Estwing version is neither fish nor fowl, since it isn't even a felling axe. To paraphrase Cooper, what is it for? To sell, of course.
Cognosce teipsum et disce pati

"People come and go in our lives, especially the online ones. Some leave a fond memory, and some a bad taste." -Ass-op

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blackeagle603
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Re: Estwing goes medieval.

Post by blackeagle603 » Mon Jan 12, 2015 4:05 pm

Yep, cut my teeth on a double bitted axe. Single bit will do but much prefer the swing of a double bit.

Just didn't see single bits in use much at all in our corner of the PNW woods (other than boy scouts and occasionally at firewood piles or campboxes until I was full grown). Thought that shorty from Estwing doesn't look to be too useful other than as a target throwing axe.
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JAG2955
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Re: Estwing goes medieval.

Post by JAG2955 » Mon Jan 12, 2015 4:55 pm

I assumed it was a throwing axe. The tomahawk looks pretty neat, and is probably effective...for whatever tomahawks are really used for nowadays.

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Durham68
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Re: Estwing goes medieval.

Post by Durham68 » Mon Jan 12, 2015 8:02 pm

Good on them for bringing a solid product into an overpriced market. The only others I've seen in that price range have polymer necks/handles.

ETA: And now I don't have to stand in front of the hammers at Home Depot wondering which would make the best weapon in an emergency.
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TheArmsman
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Re: Estwing goes medieval.

Post by TheArmsman » Mon Jan 12, 2015 8:56 pm

Durham68 wrote:Good on them for bringing a solid product into an overpriced market. The only others I've seen in that price range have polymer necks/handles.

ETA: And now I don't have to stand in front of the hammers at Home Depot wondering which would make the best weapon in an emergency.

Snort, same here. I am always thinking of alternate uses whenever I go to Lowes/Home Depot/Ace.
When death is inevitable, style counts.

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blackeagle603
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Re: Estwing goes medieval.

Post by blackeagle603 » Tue Jan 13, 2015 2:37 am

Another 4" on a roofing hatchet handle makes it pretty interesting for social work -- and maybe still reasonably practical for roofing.
"The Guncounter: More fun than a barrel of tattooed knife-fighting chain-smoking monkey butlers with drinking problems and excessive gambling debts!"

"The right of the citizens to keep and bear arms has justly been considered, as the palladium of the liberties of a republic;" Justice Story

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Windy Wilson
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Re: Estwing goes medieval.

Post by Windy Wilson » Tue Jan 13, 2015 3:36 am

Axes are pretty much 99% a dead art, except for the (very) few people who still move everything via muscle power, and a chain saw needs gasoline.
According to an old article in the Smithsonian magazine the double bitted felling axe was supposed to have two different angles between the planes of the bit.

The old (pre ww2 at least) patent axes are highly collectible and some are said to have two different alloys of steel forge-welded together. A softer steel around the eye and a hard steel at the bit. When people were actually skilled with axes the handles were thinned to the point of being a little whippy. This combination served to cushion the feller's hands. In the hands of an unskilled person like me the handles would break too quickly.
blackeagle603 wrote:Another 4" on a roofing hatchet handle makes it pretty interesting for social work -- and maybe still reasonably practical for roofing.
The 16 oz framing hammers have nice long handles and a straight claw, too. You might find something of similar proportions in 8 or 10 oz., and while carrying a hatchet around is less strange than carrying a full size ax, carrying an ordinary claw hammer might be even less strange. A woman in our neighborhood carried a nine iron.
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