p2p/mesh apps

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HTRN
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Re: p2p/mesh apps

Post by HTRN » Mon Sep 09, 2019 3:19 pm

g-man wrote:
Mon Sep 09, 2019 2:07 am
I'm a former intel officer... I can't talk about what I really want to do. :evil:
Then you can understand why no government is going to allow an anonymous communication system to exist for the plebs. Look what they did to squash encryption for use by the public.
HTRN, I would tell you that you are an evil fucker, but you probably get that a lot ~ Netpackrat

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BDK
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Re: p2p/mesh apps

Post by BDK » Mon Sep 09, 2019 9:36 pm

As y'all know, I'm an attorney. I started thinking about this when a client did a mild, but stupid thing. I HAD to be sure to maintain privilege... And that meant I could not call the client to talk things out.

Cell companies selling location info, and all communications being monitored, simply cannot be tolerated. (EG, say you buy all location info for people with a high level of interest in geology in Houston. I do not THINK that would violate insider trading, and could be incredibly valuable.)

Or bankruptcy attorneys, or white collar criminal defense attorneys, etc.

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blackeagle603
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Re: p2p/mesh apps

Post by blackeagle603 » Tue Sep 10, 2019 11:55 pm

Question becomes not what is perfect and ultimate. Rather, what's enough for most cases?

e.g. Protests to stop be blocked and not immediately/readily cracked?
Or, not readily visible and accessible in the client priviledge scenario BDK put forth.
"Good opsec will save you from bad crypto, but good crypto won't save you from bad opsec," says Kenn White, director of the Open Crypto Audit Project, referencing a classic warning from security researcher The Grugq. "It's easy for people to be confused."

RTWT related article
in Wired
"The Guncounter: More fun than a barrel of tattooed knife-fighting chain-smoking monkey butlers with drinking problems and excessive gambling debts!"

"The right of the citizens to keep and bear arms has justly been considered, as the palladium of the liberties of a republic;" Justice Story

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blackeagle603
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Re: p2p/mesh apps

Post by blackeagle603 » Tue Sep 10, 2019 11:59 pm

From an article in Slate:
When WikiLeaks released Vault7, a series of leaks on the CIA’s hacking tools, people who use secure messaging apps were alarmed. The press release accompanying the trove of documents stated that the CIA was able to “bypass” the encryption of secure messaging tools—including Signal—“by hacking the ‘smart’ phones that they run on and collecting audio and message traffic before encryption is applied.”

This led some to believe that the CIA broke Signal, compromising their favorite secure messaging app. But a closer look reveals that the situation isn’t as dire as it seems. The CIA does not have a way around the cryptographic elements of the app. “They did not break Signal any more than looking at your phone over your shoulder breaks Signal,” said Nicholas Weaver, a computer security researcher at the International Computer Science Institute.

The CIA and other government agencies can circumvent messaging apps if they compromise your smartphone. But that’s not something they can do on a mass scale at the push of a button. Joseph Lorenzo Hall, chief technologist at the Center for Democracy & Technology, says that the kind of bulk surveillance we learned about through Edward Snowden’s revelations is now much more difficult to accomplish thanks to the proliferation of end-to-end encryption (including HTTPS, iMessage, and Signal).
RTWT
"The Guncounter: More fun than a barrel of tattooed knife-fighting chain-smoking monkey butlers with drinking problems and excessive gambling debts!"

"The right of the citizens to keep and bear arms has justly been considered, as the palladium of the liberties of a republic;" Justice Story

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